Bulk Converting M4A files to MP3

Bulk Converting M4A files to MP3

Let's say you suddenly realize some of your older music collection is in the wrong format. Everything is organized into folders for albums, etc. and you don't want to have to go into every subdirectory and individually convert the files. Here's a little bash script for you. Place this in the top level directory of the tree you want to convert and it will bulk convert all m4a files into mp3 files. It's an easy way to convert all the files in a specific tree and could easily be modified for different file formats.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Aug 30, 2013 | Linux Tricks
Formatting Large USB Sticks for MP3 Use

Formatting Large USB Sticks for MP3 Use

A lot of newer vehicles have USB sockets for plugging in your music collection. The default FAT32 format that Ubuntu does in the disk manager just doesn't cut it. In many cases, the vehicle may not even be able to read a stick formatted with the default Ubuntu method.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Apr 26, 2013 | Linux Tricks, Desktop Linux
Ubuntu Quantal policykit failure

Ubuntu Quantal policykit failure

So since installing Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal, I've been plagued by strange authentication errors. I thought for some time that it was related to my use of LDAP for domain admin authentication, but it turns out it's more devious. I run Gnome3. That means when I launch something like Synaptic I typically pop the menu up, type in "syna" and hit enter to launch the app.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Apr 08, 2013 | Desktop Linux
Finding Packet Loss

Finding Packet Loss

Finding Packet loss on a large wide network or within your ISP's network can be difficult. Generally the cause of packet loss is bad hardware or lines at a specific location, or an oversaturated network. Since most pathways on the internet will require 10 hops or more, figuring out which hop is troublesome can be difficult.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Jan 04, 2013 | Linux Tricks
Ubuntu LDAP Admins and GUI Root Passwords

Ubuntu LDAP Admins and GUI Root Passwords

Here's a problem that has driven me crazy over the past year or so. First, the Way it's Supposed to Work. In Ubuntu, you don't typically have a "root" user password. If a user needs to do something that requires administrator rights, they are placed in the "admin" group and when they try to say - edit the global network settings - it asks them for their password and uses "sudo" to do whatever they want.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Mar 31, 2012 | Servers, Desktop Linux
Testing Flash Cards

Testing Flash Cards

With today's digital devices using larger and larger memory cards, particularly with cameras it's a good idea to put new cards through the wringer before you use them. Better to find out before shooting your kid's birthday party that the card is bad, rather than finding out during, or worse, after.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Feb 07, 2012 | Linux Tricks
A Little Ubuntu Tip For you

A Little Ubuntu Tip For you

Here's a little tip for you. If you run Ubuntu and decide to make a quick backup of your home directory using cp -R -d, make sure to "eject" any network shares you mounted using the file browser.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Oct 15, 2011 | Desktop Linux
Simple Changes To Secure an Ubuntu Deskop

Simple Changes To Secure an Ubuntu Deskop

When you talk about desktop security there's a lot that can be discussed: user permissions, firewalls, etc. Here's a little step that gets overlooked quite a bit, but can go a long way to preventing a direct attack against your destkops. In Ubuntu Desktop, you can deploy custom Gnome settings that override the defaults by dropping an XML file at: /etc/gconf/gconf.xml.mandatory/%gconf-tree.xml I use Puppet to deploy these settings to all of my Linux desktops. If you're from the Windows world, this is like using group policy, but with much more granular control. Here's a sample of a few things you should change:

Read more
Posted by Tony on Mar 19, 2011 | Desktop Linux, Linux Tricks
Changing a Linux Server Partitions With a GUI

Changing a Linux Server Partitions With a GUI

Continuing my "avoid the console" series, I'm going to cover remotely managing partitions on a Linux server. Yes, this will involve a bit of console, but this will set you on a path to using GUI tools on your servers without having to install a complete windowing environment. Installing a complete desktop-like environment is a waste of resources for most servers, so keeping things to a minimum helps to streamline and allow your servers to do more things with less hardware.

Read more
Posted by Tony on Sep 01, 2010 | Servers, Linux Tricks